Honor, Discipline, and Dylann Roof

Roof_100_1688American Dissident Voices broadcast of June 27, 2015

by Kevin Alfred Strom

JUDGED FROM a Cosmotheist perspective, the recent actions of Dylann Roof — who killed nine Blacks by shooting them in their largely-segregated Charleston, SC church a few days ago — are simultaneously understandable, inevitable, and misdirected. And they may contribute — in ways that neither Roof nor our enemies anticipate — to breaking the stasis that holds White people in our current downward slow-death spiral. (ILLUSTRATION: Dylann Roof; photograph from his LastRhodesian Web site)

What Dylann Roof did on June 17 was understandable for many, many reasons — almost all of which are considered unmentionable by the powers that be in the former United States of America.

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Money for Nothing

david-tepperAmerican Dissident Voices broadcast of June 20, 2015

by Kevin Alfred Strom

MOST OF THEIR NAMES are unknown to the public. Some even manage to stay off the quasi-official lists of the richest or highest-paid men, despite having paid themselves billions or hundreds of millions of dollars per year for many, many years. (Perhaps they’re blowing it all on cocaine or gambling or trips to Jeffrey Epstein’s pedophile island, so they really have no income — but I doubt it.) They are the owners and managers of secretive, largely unregulated, millionaires-only mutual funds called hedge funds — “funds” which are overwhelmingly controlled by Jews. (ILLUSTRATION: David Tepper, the highest paid hedge fund manager in 2014)

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Shaw and the Religion of the Future

george-bernard-shawAmerican Dissident Voices broadcast of June 13, 2015

by Kevin Alfred Strom

TODAY I am going to devote this program to the ideas of a man whose vision was the precursor and inspiration for Dr. William Pierce’s Cosmotheism — George Bernard Shaw.

Shaw (pictured), like many geniuses such as Ezra Pound, can sometimes appear confounding and contradictory. Shaw had his “GBS” persona and he did use satire, even laughing at his own positions through the characters in his plays at times. That’s the kind of thing you do when you have a 200 IQ — and, as Shaw quipped, when you are missing the phrenologists’ “bump of veneration.” With evident exasperation at the slow progress of human and social evolution, he endorsed any dictator in sight — “men who get things done” — as preferable to damnable democracy. He took public positions that were designedly shocking, and it’s easy to use the more extreme among these to attack him, as Crazy Glenn Beck and the other leaders of Conservakin have done.

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The Fragility of Infinity

Domenico Fetti - Archimedes Deep in Thought (1620)American Dissident Voices broadcast of June 6, 2015

by Kevin Alfred Strom

ON THE ISLAND of Sicily, 2,200 years ago, a White man contemplated infinity. His name was Archimedes.

When you extend a dimensionless point into a line of any length, he reasoned, that point must be repeated in its new dimension an infinite number of times, and that is true no matter whether the line is a thousand million miles in length — or the length of your little finger. A paradox: How can one infinity be so obviously larger than another, or be larger at all? (ILLUSTRATION: Domenico Fetti – Archimedes Deep in Thought [1620])

Trying to solve a problem, Archimedes then reasoned about infinity from another perspective: If you create, for each integer in a list — such as one, two, three, and so on — a matching even number, so that one is matched to two; two is matched to four; three is matched to six, four is matched to eight, et cetera, then you have an even more astounding paradox. That series of matching numbers can, obviously, be continued without end — and you will never “run out” of even numbers to match with the integers. So you end up with the following paradoxical conclusion: The set of all integers and the set of all even integers are the same size. Obviously true — yet, how can it be true?

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